Celebrating Polish Independence Day

Today I was featured in a GORGEOUS treasury collection on Etsy in honor of the Polish Independence Day. Many of you know me as a “Hippie Cowgirl” from a small West Texas Town, what you dont know about me is that my family is originally from Poland. Yes, that explains the unusual blond hair and brown eyes!
Here is the beautiful collection that I was featured in, it is truly a masterpiece! Below the treasury is an explanation of Polish Independence Day.

‘Today is Polish Independence Day ! Celebrate with us !’ by Koroneczka

koroneczkowy nr 438


Handmade POLISH EAGLE Wood P…

$25.00

Spot Two-Ply Reversible Skir…

$35.00

ELISE, brooch felted, white …

$24.00

Red Sinamay Straw Fascinator…

$147.00

Red and Gray Earrings

$15.90

Wood Stretch Funky Bracelet …

$13.00

Fabric flower brooch with vi…

$15.90

Adjustable Ring, Handmade Fa…

$7.90

Wedding patchwork white and …

$1500.00

Pink, White, Magenta, Red Ab…

$35.00

Red & White Swirling Heart 4…

$15.00

Christmas Red Heart White Po…

$30.00

Red and White Christmas Orna…

$65.00

Red Heart Earrings, Swarovsk…

$25.00

Peppermint Magnet or Push Pi…

$7.50

SALE Crochet Cowl Scarf – Re…

$26.00

Treasury tool by Red Row Studio.

For those of you who have never hear of Polish Independence Day I would like to share a little bit about it with you.
The Polish Independence Day is very different from the American 4th of July, with its happiness, feasts and fireworks. Polish Independence Day, celebrated on November the 11th, marks the restoration of Poland’s independence in 1918. After 123 years of partitions Poland reappeared on the map of Europe as a sovereign democratic state.

Polish Independence Day is strongly connected with general Jozef Pilsudski. After being feed from German prison Pilsudski came back to Poland on the morning of Sunday 10th November 1918. Only a handful of people knew about his arrival and came to Warsaw’s Vienna Station to welcome him. On November 11, 1918 the Germans and the Allies signed the agreement to end the First World War.

On the same day the Regency Council appointed Pilsudski Commander-in-Chief of Polish forces and asked him to form a Government. However on 13th November the Regency Council was dissolved and handed over to Pilsudski its “duties and responsibility toward the Polish people”. Pilsudski was now the highest autority of Poland and would remain so for 98 days until 20th February 1919 when he handed power to the Sejm.

Piłsudski came to Warsaw a day before November 11th, and on the date that is now celebrated as Polish Independence Day he was appointed Commander in Chief of the Polish Forces and given the assignment of forming the first real Polish government after a 123-year period. November 11th wasn’t announced Independence Day until two years after Pilsudski’s death in 1935. About that time, the largest of the Kraków Mounds , devoted to Pilsudski, was erected.

After World War II the Polish People’s authorities removed Independence Day from the calendar but not from the hearts of the Polish people. The reclamation of independence continued to be celebrated annually on 11th November. In 1989 the 9th term of the Sejm government gave the holiday back to the Polish people.

A huge “Dziękują! (Thank You)” to my friend and team mate, Anna, for featuring me in a treasury collection on Etsy in honor of this special day!

You can view my friend Anna’s Etsy shop here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/Koroneczka?ref=pr_shop_more

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